Tower Brdige Glass Walkway.

Tower Bridge Glass Floor Walkway, London

April 2016

The Tower Bridge is a combined drawbridge and suspension bridge that crosses the River Thames and is an iconic symbol of London. It consists of two bridge towers tied together at the upper level by two horizontal walkways. The walkways were designed so public could cross the bridge when it was raised but was later closed down due to lack of use. The drawbridge opens for river traffic at 24 hours’ notice around 1,000 times a year. You can check the advanced bridge lift time here.

Each of the drawbridge pivots, and its operating machinery are housed in the base of each tower. The bridge deck is freely accessible to both vehicles and pedestrians, whereas the bridge’s twin towers walkways is accessible by lifts. The Victorian engine rooms on the ground floor together forms part of the Tower Bridge Exhibition.

Tower Brdige Glass Walkway.

The Tower Bridge raising to allow vessel to pass underneath.

Tower Brdige Glass Walkway.

London icon with bridge fully raised as seen from the river bank.

Tower Brdige Glass Walkway.

Pre-purchased voucher exchanged for tickets to go up the Tower Bridge. Not free, it cost £8.

Tower Brdige Glass Walkway.

Small queue waiting for the lift up.

Tower Brdige Glass Walkway.

One of the two Tower Bridge walkways.

Glass walkways were introduced in 2014 and measures 11 meters long and 1.8 meters wide along the 61 meters walkway and consist of six separate panels weighing more than ½ ton each. Apart from experiencing stunning panoramic views surrounding the Thames from 42m above the river, visitors can view vessels sailing under the bridge and pedestrians crossing on the road below. On specific days, you can even catch the rising and lowering of the drawbridge right beneath you. The glass is five layers thick and can hold the weight of an elephant.

Tower Brdige Glass Walkway.

Tower Bridge Glass Walkway. Both walkways has glass floor.

Tower Brdige Glass Walkway.

Looking down to one of the tower foundation. Big bus crossing the bridge.

Tower Brdige Glass Walkway.

The ‘dots’ in the photo are imbedded in the glass.

Tower Brdige Glass Walkway.

The Tower Bridge raising as seen from the glass floor.

Tower Brdige Glass Walkway.

The walkway on the other side of the tower.

Tower Brdige Glass Walkway.

Bridge lifting time schedule..

Tower Brdige Glass Walkway.

To the left side of the river bank, the City Hall, The Shard & HMS Belfast.

Tower Brdige Glass Walkway.

To the right, Sky Garden, the Gherkin and Tower of London.

Tower Brdige Glass Walkway.

The walkway as seen from ground level.

The original drawbridge lifting mechanism were powered by pressurised water back then, has now been replaced by modern electro-hydraulic drive system. Some of the original hydraulic machinery has been retained, although no longer in use, is open to the public and can be viewed in the engine room south side of the bridge.

Tower Brdige Glass Walkway.

This way to Engine Room exhibition.

Tower Brdige Glass Walkway.

Giant water pump used to raise the bridge.

Tower Brdige Glass Walkway.

Pressure pipes.

Tower Brdige Glass Walkway.

Boiler to produce steam to drive the pumps.

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