Monthly Archives: November 2016

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, West Australia

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, Western Australia

October 2016

After leaving Cape Leeuwin, we headed for the Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk some 273km away in Denmark. It was almost a 4 hours drive with several pit stops. Along the way, we passed through several types of vegetation and the one through the Karri trees (again) was the most intrigued. Those tress were just majestic and magnificent to see.

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, West Australia

A welcomed relieve being able to be out of the car after a 4 hours drive. We arrived around 1:30 p.m.

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, West Australia

Our road trip from Cape Leeuwin to the Valley of the Giants.

The Valley of the Giants Treetop Walk gives a bird’s-eye view of the majestic 400+ year old tingle trees. The tree top walkway is a series of lightweight steel trusses built on steel pylons to form a 600 meter circuit over a deep gully. The construction of the walkway gave us a sense of security knowing its safe to explore the treetop although it does sway on some sections. Barring crowds, you could do this circuit within 20 minutes and if you did not get enough, you can repeat a second circuit before exiting.

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, West Australia

Entrance to the Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk.

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, West Australia

The ticket counter and entry to the Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk.

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, West Australia

Entry fees as at October 2016.

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, West Australia

Tickets in hand. Let’s get going.

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, West Australia

Level entry to the steel walkway.

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, West Australia

Load limit reminder for safety.

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, West Australia

The steel walkway with bench for you to rest and soak in the environment.

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, West Australia

The walkway about ½ the tree height.

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, West Australia

A sense of tranquility as you walk across the walkway.

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, West Australia

The upward incline is gentle, so no workout required.

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, West Australia

At the end, what looks like an infinity walkway. Definitely no stairs to heaven.

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, West Australia

Starting to get even higher as you can reach for the branches.

Because the walkway it is built on the side of a natural valley, as the gully descend, you gradually ascend climbing to the highest point 40 metres through the treetops and into the tingle trees canopy. The ascent and descent are easy and most part are shaded as you walk around the trunks and branches of the trees. This is the most fascinating and enjoyable part of the walk.

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, West Australia

The highest point of the walkway …. 40m in height.

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, West Australia

Even at 40m, the trees are higer than the walkway.                                                                                  Credit : Sean Mack.

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, West Australia

Across to the other end for the start of your gentle descend.

The forest is alive with the calls of the birds through the trees and the breeze stirring the leaves. Visiting the Valley of the Giants is a chance to experience the beauty and tranquility of the treetops. The size of these trees is awe inspiring and the chance to stand beneath them and then climb into their canopy is an opportunity not to be missed.

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, West Australia

Eye level view at the highest point of the walkway.

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, West Australia

Looking down to the ground.

Descending from the tree top, walk past the souvenir shop (also the exit) and it will bring you to the boardwalk of the ‘Ancient Empire’ walk. This is a continuation of your tour after the Tree Top walk (if you wish). The 450m boardwalk loop winds between and even through the giant tingle tree allowing you the chance to see its massive trunk up close. Some of these giants are over fifteen metres at its base. Here you’ll enter a grove of towering 400+ year old tingle trees which are only found in this particular area of Western Australia.

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, West Australia

The track map of the Ancient Empire walk.

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, West Australia

Tall tress reaching for the sky.

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, West Australia

Vegetation on the ground. Beware of this grass, its sharp and can cut you.

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, West Australia

This giant, living tingle tree, you can walk through.

Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk, Denmark, West Australia

You come out at this end.

Other posts from this blog :

Cape Leeuwin, Augusta, Western Australia.

Cape Leeuwin, Augusta, Western Australia

October 2016

Cape Leeuwin is one of the most scenic spot to visit in the Margaret River region. It is located at the extreme south-western point of the Australian continent. Cape Leeuwin marks the boundary between the Indian Ocean and the Southern Ocean. Augusta is the closest town to Cape Leeuwin, just a 12 minutes drive and Margaret River town being 30 minutes away.

We start our 2nd day road trip by visiting Cape Leeuwin before proceeding to the next attraction of the day. Although we arrived in Augusta in the early evening the previous day, we were unable to  make a visit here as the grounds of the lighthouse closes at 5:00 p.m.

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Arrived early. Waiting for the gate to open.

Cape Leeuwin, Augusta, Western Australia.

Location of Baywatch Manor Lodge & Cape Leeuwin lighthouse. Just 9km away.

The lighthouse precinct is enclosed in a fenced-off area which you’ll need to pay $8 to enter. To climb up the lighthouse, you’ll have to join a tour for an additional $12.

Cape Leeuwin, Augusta, Western Australia.

Entry fees prominently displayed.

Cape Leeuwin, Augusta, Western Australia.

From afar, the lighthouse draws your attention.

Cape Leeuwin, Augusta, Western Australia.

About to enter the lighthouse precinct. The morning was beautiful with clear blue sky.

Cape Leeuwin, Augusta, Western Australia.

Australian flag in the precinct compound.

Cape Leeuwin, Augusta, Western Australia.

Bench for you to sit and soak in the warmth and sight.

Cape Leeuwin, Augusta, Western Australia.

Some facts about the lighthouse.

The Cape Leeuwin lighthouse is located on its own precinct, a narrow peninsula of granite jutting out into the ocean built-in the late 19th century. It offers spectacular views of the cape as well as views out to sea. At 39m high and 56m above the sea, the lighthouse is the third tallest in Australia and the tallest in Western Australia. It stands at its lonely position near the edge of the dramatic granite peninsula. It was one of the last in the world to remain manually operated until 1982.

Cape Leeuwin, Augusta, Western Australia.

Wind wave at the lighthouse.

Cape Leeuwin, Augusta, Western Australia.

Entrance to the lighthouse.

Cape Leeuwin, Augusta, Western Australia.

Some facts about meeting of the two oceans.

Cape Leeuwin, Augusta, Western Australia.

Trying to locate the imaginary line separating Southern Ocean & the Indian Ocean.

Cape Leeuwin, Augusta, Western Australia.

Lookout point below the lighthouse facing the two oceans.

Cape Leeuwin, Augusta, Western Australia.

Cape Leeuwin lighthouse, Augusta, Western Australia.

About 250m before you reach the lighthouse car park to your right, there is an old Historic Water Wheel. It was built to pump water from a spring up to the lighthouse cottages and over the years the wood that it was originally made from has been coated with minerals. The fossilised water wheel is worth a visit, as where the sea meets the rocky beach, the water a crystal clear. The water wheel is located next to the car park.

Cape Leeuwin, Augusta, Western Australia.

History of  water wheel.

Cape Leeuwin, Augusta, Western Australia.

The now ‘fossilised’ water wheel.

Cape Leeuwin, Augusta, Western Australia.

Crystal clear waters.

Cape Leeuwin, Augusta, Western Australia.

This part is the Indian Ocean.

Cape Leeuwin, Augusta, Western Australia.

The lighthouse as seen from the water wheel.

Cape Leeuwin, Augusta, Western Australia.

Location of The Historic Water Wheel in respect to the Lighthouse car park.

Other posts from this blog :

Baywatch Manor, Augusta, Western Australia.

Baywatch Manor, Augusta, Western Australia

October 2016

For our first night outside Perth, we stayed at Baywatch Manor located right in Augusta. Our double ensuite room was comfortable and comes with a queen size bed, mini fridge, TV, tea/coffee making facility and a portable heater. Parking is free at the lodge and the free wi-fi is exceptionally strong and stable. The sliding glass door of the bedroom opens to the balcony with nice views of the Blackwood river.

There is a big communal kitchen and dining area on the ground floor which is very well equipped and great for self catering. Location of the lodge is right in town and is an easy walk to IGA store. Two petrol stations are nearby as well. It’s a double storey premises just off the main road and has a small and well-kept cozy garden with BBQ. We were one of the two guests staying at the lodge thus we had a quiet and good night’s sleep. A really great place to stay.

Baywatch Manor, Augusta, Western Australia.

No need to worry, we’ve pre-booked our room.

Day1 road trip from Perth to Augusta.

Baywatch Manor, Augusta, Western Australia.

The lodge with its small but well-kept and maintained garden.

Baywatch Manor, Augusta, Western Australia.

Flowers and shrubs as you walk to the office at the end.

Baywatch Manor, Augusta, Western Australia.

The front lawn with table, benches & BBQ pit.

Baywatch Manor, Augusta, Western Australia.

Our room on the 1st floor by the emergency staircase. Free parking available.

Baywatch Manor, Augusta, Western Australia.

Entrance to the lodge from the main road.

Baywatch Manor, Augusta, Western Australia.

View of Blackwood river from within our room.

Baywatch Manor, Augusta, Western Australia.

Our double ensuite room.

Baywatch Manor, Augusta, Western Australia.

Comfortable queen sized bed.

Baywatch Manor, Augusta, Western Australia.

Amenities in the room.

Baywatch Manor, Augusta, Western Australia.

Chest of drawers to put our belongings.

Baywatch Manor, Augusta, Western Australia.

Our room, no. 5 probably has the best view.

Baywatch Manor, Augusta, Western Australia.

Outside view of room no. 5.

Baywatch Manor, Augusta, Western Australia.

Balcony with tranquil view.

Baywatch Manor, Augusta, Western Australia.

Blackwood river flowing to the sea as the sun starts to set.

Baywatch Manor, Augusta, Western Australia.

Towards our far right, is probably the view of the coast.

Other posts from this blog :

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