Monthly Archives: Nov 2015

Rabat

King’s Palace, Rabat, Morocco

Just over 1¾ hours drive from Ain Diab, Casablanca we reached Rabat the capital of Morocco. First in the itinerary is a visit to the King’s palace. We noted that in every major city in Morocco, the king has a palace. Upon arrival, it was drizzling with strong winds which literally made us shiver due to the low temperature in November. Fortunately it lasted for a while and we were than able to stroll the outer perimeter of the palace.

After the King’s palace, we will be visiting the mausoleum of Mohammed V and Kasbah of Udayas before retiring for the day to our hotel.

Rabat

50km more to Rabat. It rained on-and-off during the journey.

Rabat

Travelling route from Ain Diab, Casablanca to Rabat.

King's palace, rabat

Approaching the palace from the parking lot some distance away. Notice the strong winds blowing the palm leaves.

King's palace, rabat

The flag blowing in the wind. The flag indicates the presence of the King in the palace.

King's palace, rabat

The main entrance with barrier guarded by security personnel.

King's palace, rabat

Another view of the palace with the fountain switched off.

King's palace, rabat

Another entrance nearby.

King's palace, rabat

Also with it’s security detail.

King's palace, rabat

Back entrance with closed doors.

King's palace, rabat

The back entrance from afar.

King's palace, rabat

Mosque nearby the palace where our bus parked.

Rabat itinerary

Rabat itinerary – King’s palace, Mausoleum of Mohammed V and the Kasbah of the Udayas.

Rabat

The newly (2012) launched tram in Rabat.

ain diab, casablanca

Ain Diab, Casablanca, Morocco

Before continuing our tour to Rabat just a little more than 100 kms from Casablanca, we had lunch at Ain Diab. It is a seaside suburb of Casablanca and known as the corniche of Morocco or to its extreme, the riviera of Africa. Passing the neighbourhood getting to the beachfront you’ll get to see posh residences.

A walk along the boulevard exposes you to the mighty Atlantic ocean with its rough waves, the beach is nothing out of the extra-ordinary. It’s a popular spot among the locals and tourists and during the summer expect ½ million visitors here. Properties fronting the beach are commercial buildings like hotels and restaurants making up the numbers. In 1958, Ain Diab hosted one round of the F1 races here but unfortunately never again.

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One of the posh residence on your way to the beachfront of Ain Diab. This belongs to an Arab prince which has a mosque in the compound and open to public for Friday prayers. Gosh, a mosque in his house!

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Street into the beachfront. You can deduce from this type of advertising campaign, what type of crowd Ain Diab draws.

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The street just besides the beachfront.

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The beach.

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McD and other fast food by the beach. So an inexpensive lunch can be had here.

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Where we had our seafood lunch on the 2nd floor terrace, just across the Atlantic ocean.

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Atlantic ocean from our lunch terrace.

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Those rough waves are intimidating.

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Black heavy clouds just before the rain starts. Notice the rainbow?

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Veggies and rice for starter.

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Mixed seafood lunch.

Hassan II mosque Casablanca

Hassan II Mosque, Casablanca, Morocco

The Hassan II Mosque is one majestic and gigantic building. Not to mention a beautiful building too. It’s foundations lie partly on reclaimed land and partly in the Atlantic Ocean. At 210 metres the minaret is the tallest religious structure in the world. Depending how you define largest, biggest, size or capacity, Hassan II mosque is the top 5 largest mosque in the world, the first being the Haramain Mosque in Mecca.

Not withstanding that the afternoon prayer is a couple of hours away, the doors to the mosque were shut when we reached it. We were told there are escorted tour of the mosque held at specific times and cost €12. So I guess, for Muslims to enter the mosque for free, is just before or during any of the five prayer times. (Correct me if I’m wrong).

Hassan II mosque Casablanca

Even at a distance, the Hassan II mosque is majestic.

Hassan II mosque Casablanca

At the entrance, the complex houses a museum.

Hassan II mosque Casablanca

The museum.

Hassan II mosque Casablanca

A ‘small’ garden in the huge courtyard.

Hassan II mosque Casablanca

The seemingly fierce Atlantic ocean.

Hassan II mosque Casablanca

At close distance, you can only partially frame the mosque.

Hassan II mosque Casablanca

The other part of the mosque. Corridor with arches.

Hassan II mosque Casablanca

Doors leading into the mosque prayer hall.

Hassan II mosque Casablanca

Huge doors with inscribed design. Notice the size of the door hinge.

Hassan II mosque Casablanca

Yes brothers, you ARE small. No point arguing with the door.

Hassan II mosque Casablanca

The unmistakable Moroccan tile design on the walls.

Hassan II mosque Casablanca

Tiles on pillar base.

Hassan II mosque Casablanca

Close-up on one of the pillars.

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